Odie Performs At The Moroccan Lounge In DTLA

We first heard of canadian-born pop artist Odie when he released his music out into the world back in 2014. The move was bold and necessary but it wasn’t by choice.  The loving push came from his best friend and now full-time manager Christopher Emmet. Now, nearly four years later, Odie and Emmit sit outside a […]

We first heard of canadian-born pop artist Odie when he released his music out into the world back in 2014. The move was bold and necessary but it wasn’t by choice.  The loving push came from his best friend and now full-time manager Christopher Emmet. Now, nearly four years later, Odie and Emmit sit outside a pair of cathedral steps in Paris, France, as the two embark on Odie’s very first  world tour. Upon the release of Odie’s debut album Analogue, the 21-year-old living legend announced he’d be going on an eight city stop Spiritual Noise tour. The tour starts in Paris, ends in New York and makes a pitstop in good ole LA this July at The Moroccan Lounge.

INSPIRATION BEHIND ANALOGUE

Inspired by the sounds of African gospel music and Feel Kuti, Analogue  provides its listener with a truly spiritual experience, hence the name behind the tour. I was fortunate enough to sit down  with Odie before he set out on a two month trip that could potentially change his life as he knew it. If his live show is anything like the encounter we shared, its safe to see you should prepare yourselves to witness a glimpse of heaven.

THE MAN BEHIND THE MAGIC

Meeting with Odie at Los Penasquitos Canyon Reserve in San Diego, CA serves as the perfect landscape for embarking on a day that feels like a dream within a dream.  We climb up bigger than life branches. Trek across a bridge overlooking the creek and revel in the nature that surrounds us. We do this as Odie begins to share with me his thoughts on perception vs. reality while he stares intently at the light dancing on the trees. We discuss the concept of mermaids, aliens, spirituality, and his greatest fear of being lost at sea.

He tells me, “I love the water but I respect it so much that I fear it. Could you imagine? Being stranded on a boat, looking into the horizon and seeing nothing but a vast blue ocean ahead? Nah, Fuck that.” He tells me he”ll try to stay alive until his mind gives out on him and he wonders what I would do if I ever find myself stranded at sea. As our day continues I begin to realize this guy is just as curious about me as I am about him.

He wants to know if I think time is real. If love is real. He’s curious about  how I can be so sure of something that I can never physically touch or feel. I tell him love for me is not a feeling, it’s a person. When I touch her she’s soft and when we kiss it feels like home. He pauses for a moment. Processes what I’ve said. Looks at me, and smiles. Odie’s journey into the music industry is much like the journey we are taking today. Filled with events that feel like a scene from the show Atlanta.  I refer to these moments as magic. Odie calls them “weird as fuck.”

LOVE AND WHAT LIES AHEAD

We talk about his lyrics and I admit to him how impressive I think it is that he’s only twenty-one years old yet he writes about love and life with decades worth of wisdom. Odie tells me that  while he’s never been in a serious relationship himself, he’s seen enough of them evolve and dissolve around him to know the biggest mistake one can make is “staying in it for too long.” When it comes to soulmates, he believes we all have multiple soulmates. They come in the form of friends, lovers, parents, children but in the end he believes we all have that one person we’re intended to be with. “If you’re lucky you meet your soulmate in this life. If you really lucky, you spend forever with them.” 

He reveals to me that his biggest struggle as an artist and as a human being, is the battle he fights inside his head.  That’s part of the reason why he’s never been in a relationship. But being inside his head and analyzing life, love, and every topic under the sun is also what makes him so brilliant. He tells me he’s never let any external circumstances keep him from believing in himself or his music. “Not race, economic status, nothing,” he says. “The only thing that can stop me from being the version of myself I see inside my head is me.”

While Odie didn’t elaborate on exactly who he is inside his head, I’ve got a feeling he’s getting ready to reveal him during this Spiritual Noise Tour. Curious? Me too. Join me on July 9th at the Moroccan Lounge, its time to find out who Odie really is. Ready or not, here he comes.

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Eva is a freelance writer living in Los Angeles with a Bachelor's Degree in Print-Online Journalism. Interest include: fashion, travel, queer culture, music and art.